How does one exactly improve on a particular section?

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OlegPerry97

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How does one exactly improve on a particular section?

Postby OlegPerry97 » Sat Apr 06, 2019 5:17 pm

They don't sell PT's by category and I can clearly identify which ones I have the most trouble with. I've gone through PowerScore and reviewed the missed questions and gotten them right but it still takes a bit of time and I don't feel like I have control over the question type. I don't care to become a savant in Flaw arguments but I want to be able to approach them with more confidence. I ordered the 5 lb. Manhattan Prep book with drills...any experience with those? I just feel like I'm in a vicious cycle of "miss...review...answer correctly..."ohh"...miss again...wtf".

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CardozoLaw09

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Re: How does one exactly improve on a particular section?

Postby CardozoLaw09 » Sat Apr 06, 2019 6:52 pm

Look into Cambridge LSAT - you can practice questions by "type" - they were huge in building my confidence for particular question types when I was prepping.

Blueprint LSAT

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Re: How does one exactly improve on a particular section?

Postby Blueprint LSAT » Mon Apr 08, 2019 6:57 pm

Our system and several others out there let you make practice sets by question type and it is really helpful. I can't speak to the others, but I know ours also has several other options you can select to refine your practice.

Also, if you feel like you are spinning your wheels, go back and review the how and the why of what you are doing rather than just repeating it. With flaws, if you get really good at spotting the conclusion and what evidence is being offered to support it you will start to see the problems up front and processing the answers will get a lot easier. That isn't to say you will always be right. They love to hide the flaw using the language normally associated with other flaws. But if you really drill down on spotting how the various moving parts of the argument interact you will be able to unravel even the hardest flaw questions eventually. If you are willing to "become a savant" you may find it is worth it. :)

Andrew McDonald, Blueprint Instructor



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