What would a 30 day crash course in LSAT prep look like

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Law 202x

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Re: What would a 30 day crash course in LSAT prep look like

Postby Law 202x » Fri Jan 26, 2018 6:16 am

FN-2187 wrote:
Law 202x wrote: I'm not sure what can reasonably be done in the next 15 days.


Based on the thread, you might want to reconsider Feb and prep for June or later.


I've already commented on that.

Law 202x

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Re: What would a 30 day crash course in LSAT prep look like

Postby Law 202x » Fri Jan 26, 2018 6:34 am

Doing well on LSAT is the sum of native ability and strategy. Diagnostic score, which presumably is in a pre-strategic phase prior to study, is highly reflective of native ability. The difference of your diagnostic score with 180 reflects the amount which you stand to gain, if you make a perfect score on test day. That difference can be reduced with practice, which focuses on deploying efficient and effective strategies while working on honing your native abilities.

Now with that said, whether you are planning on a 30 day method of improving your LSAT or a 3 month method, understanding strategies that work is going to be a major key, if not the biggest key to success. Of course strategizing works with native ability, so the quantities are not strictly separable, but without strategy, I don't think one will get better in some sort of organic way that is not rooted in answering the question of, "How can I solve this problem, systematically and effectively?"

As a result, there are question types that appear frequently, an example follows. I would invite anyone with insight into this area to leave a comment on what you identified or any non-flaming comment that you would like to leave.

Q: ----

a. Presenting the situation to be explained as part of a general pattern
b. referring to the unacceptable consequences of adopting a particular explanation
c. showing that two alternate explanations for a situation are equally probable
d. citing a law of nature to explain a particular kind of change
e. explaining why a situation came about by referring to the intended outcome of a course of action

Doing well on any particular section is about becoming familiar with the types of questions that will be asked and the types of answers which will be available and discerning which is the appropriate choice. Since there are only finite types and finite answers, then 30 days is a sufficient period for familiarizing oneself with the types and the responses to be expected to a given question.

Law 202x

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Re: What would a 30 day crash course in LSAT prep look like

Postby Law 202x » Fri Jan 26, 2018 6:41 am

A time tested principle of intelligence testing includes the idea of what sort of swing can we see in a candidate's score if tested under the most optimal of circumstances versus the worst. Many people report not functioning as well in early morning as late morning, or report being more productive at nighttime than daytime. So I've concluded that an intelligence test score can hover around a vicinity of ± 7 points of the candidate's actual score. This is an extreme range which can reliably be defined as ±4, excepting a few cases.

Of course the standard error of measurement of the Law School Admission Test is ~ 3 points, therefore at certain points along the distribution, preparedness, energy, focus, and any of the so-called subjective variables that impact your performance can be highly costly if not working in your favor.

Ergo, there is simply the occasion of chance that impacts the score, with the caveat that with careful preparation, the standard error of the mean can be utilized to work in your favor.

Law 202x

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Re: What would a 30 day crash course in LSAT prep look like

Postby Law 202x » Wed Jan 31, 2018 9:55 am

Well, I've gained a solid 3 points in my sixteen month break without any study at all and I'm starting to get over the time strain on games. I've been attempting more and it's enough improvement for me to think that another ten days will be enough for me to get even faster. I need to bring a wristwatch so that I can monitor myself. I probably even need to use the wristwatch in practice so that I develop my system. I need to improve my LR since those I'm missing around -6 each section. RC, there are better or worser days but that would be moot if I could get LR to move. I need to review my latest PTs.

Law 202x

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Re: What would a 30 day crash course in LSAT prep look like

Postby Law 202x » Wed Jan 31, 2018 9:58 am

The good news is LR is taking me only around 20 minutes to complete and I'm going -6 so if I had to use that 35 minutes which I will certainly do on the test day, I will have more time to investigate any questions I'm unsure about. But too often, I'm not even sure which ones I'm unsure about, so I need to focus on identifying those cases.

albanach

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Re: What would a 30 day crash course in LSAT prep look like

Postby albanach » Wed Jan 31, 2018 11:38 am

Law 202x wrote:Doing well on LSAT is the sum of native ability and strategy.


Have you actually done well on the LSAT to know this or is it pure speculation at this point?

Law 202x wrote:Diagnostic score, which presumably is in a pre-strategic phase prior to study, is highly reflective of native ability. The difference of your diagnostic score with 180 reflects the amount which you stand to gain, if you make a perfect score on test day. That difference can be reduced with practice, which focuses on deploying efficient and effective strategies while working on honing your native abilities.


Yes. There are countless success stories on this site from people who have followed a study methodology and taken a middling 150s diagnostic and scored in the 99th percentile. Few if any have succeeded in doing that in a month.

Law 202x wrote:Now with that said, whether you are planning on a 30 day method of improving your LSAT or a 3 month method, understanding strategies that work is going to be a major key, if not the biggest key to success. Of course strategizing works with native ability, so the quantities are not strictly separable, but without strategy, I don't think one will get better in some sort of organic way that is not rooted in answering the question of, "How can I solve this problem, systematically and effectively?"


Yes, these are the techniques all the major courses will teach you. Almost every guide to success is the same - master the test first, then work on speed until you can be successful in the allotted time.

Law 202x wrote:Since there are only finite types and finite answers, then 30 days is a sufficient period for familiarizing oneself with the types and the responses to be expected to a given question.


Actually, the universe of questions is pretty broad, particularly in areas outside logic games. That's why most folk recommend mastering logic games, such that it should repeatably be a -0 section.

You seem to have determined that, because of variance between the question types in earlier tests and in recent ones that the question formats you will encounter will be similar to the recent ones. That is a fallacy, since we know from experience both that question types evolve and that older question types can reappear.

My question to you, as someone who becomes bored easily, is do you really want to become a lawyer?

Law 202x

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Re: What would a 30 day crash course in LSAT prep look like

Postby Law 202x » Thu Feb 01, 2018 11:05 am

[quote="albanach
You seem to have determined that, because of variance between the question types in earlier tests and in recent ones that the question formats you will encounter will be similar to the recent ones. That is a fallacy, since we know from experience both that question types evolve and that older question types can reappear.[quote]

Then show us what you've got. That was my question initially is what you had, if anything to impart. But you're just beating around the bush. You're only eluding to the fact, or proposal that you are floating, that such a variety of question types exist but you've not supported that. Please, supply that proof or stop brow-beating me.

What did you make on the LSAT, pal?

Hand

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Re: What would a 30 day crash course in LSAT prep look like

Postby Hand » Thu Feb 01, 2018 11:12 am

Law 202x wrote:[quote="albanach
You seem to have determined that, because of variance between the question types in earlier tests and in recent ones that the question formats you will encounter will be similar to the recent ones. That is a fallacy, since we know from experience both that question types evolve and that older question types can reappear.

Then show us what you've got. That was my question initially is what you had, if anything to impart. But you're just beating around the bush. You're only eluding to the fact, or proposal that you are floating, that such a variety of question types exist but you've not supported that. Please, supply that proof or stop brow-beating me.

What did you make on the LSAT, pal?

181!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Law 202x

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Re: What would a 30 day crash course in LSAT prep look like

Postby Law 202x » Thu Feb 08, 2018 11:58 pm

I recall the words of the great patriot, Nathan Hale, falsely accused, on the eve of his execution, saying, "I regret that I have but one life to give for my country."

And while this is a considerably less eventful and significant topic in the annals of history, the eve of the February 2018 administration of the LSAT, I say, "I regret that I have but one day to continue preparing for it."

Okay so was a thirty days, (nay 26 days) hit the ground running (nay lagging) method successful, not in the least, but I have every ambition of retaking in June if I am unhappy with my performance on the February LSAT and have every ambition of learning as much from this experience as I possibly can.

A little about me, I am a very good standardized test taker who observes a meticulous routine in the hours leading up to the test. Usually wake early, even the night before, have an excellent breakfast, if not an outright dinner, maybe a steak, some fish, but something that will go to my head and give me extraordinary levels of energy. Drink a coffee. Arrive early. Empty the old tank and then get myself psyched up and then go in and tear the test up. Now if all goes according to plan, not only will I not do poorly on Saturday, I will do better than any practice test I have ever taken! Why, because I will tell myself if you don't then you are going to be back here in three months so don't do poorly because then you will be back here in three months! That usually is enough.

Vianco

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Re: What would a 30 day crash course in LSAT prep look like

Postby Vianco » Sat Feb 17, 2018 4:02 pm

Law 202x wrote:Did anyone find Super Prep 1 inordinately difficult compared to newer exams?


I did.

Vianco

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Re: What would a 30 day crash course in LSAT prep look like

Postby Vianco » Sat Feb 17, 2018 4:05 pm

This ultimately depends on what your goal score is. If you're trying to get a 160, is 30 days enough? Definitely possible. If you're gunning for 170+, 30 days is not going to be enough for the majority of people.

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Bartlet4President

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Re: What would a 30 day crash course in LSAT prep look like

Postby Bartlet4President » Fri Feb 23, 2018 6:44 pm

I’m failing to see what you are trying to do now? Dhow many points do you need to jump?



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