Useful Answers + Hot Tips From Dave Hall of Velocity

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Maple Leaf Canuck
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Re: Useful Answers + Hot Tips From the Guy Who Got 3 180s

Postby Maple Leaf Canuck » Wed Apr 16, 2014 10:45 am

Hello Dave,

I am new to the TLS Forums and am finding your insight very helpful. I have taken a Princeton Review prep course as well as read the Powerscore books. I am wondering what your thoughts are on reading the question stem prior to the stimulus? What would you advise?

Thank you for your help!

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Dave Hall
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Re: Useful Answers + Hot Tips From the Guy Who Got 3 180s

Postby Dave Hall » Thu Apr 17, 2014 6:23 pm

Maple Leaf Canuck wrote:Hello Dave,

I am new to the TLS Forums and am finding your insight very helpful. I have taken a Princeton Review prep course as well as read the Powerscore books. I am wondering what your thoughts are on reading the question stem prior to the stimulus? What would you advise?

Thank you for your help!

In the Logical Reasoning, I'm totally for it.

The question stem gives focus to my reading; if I've been asked simply to identify the Main Conclusion, I think differently (well, less) than if I need to identify a Flaw.

Ultimately, it doesn't matter too much (so, you know, do what makes you happy!), but it probably also makes you a little more efficient if you read the question first—you can likely remember a time when you read a passage, then read the question, then said "Crap. I don't know what was in that passage I just read."

Reading the question first helps eliminate some of that kind of duplicative experience by keeping you keyed to what's important the first time through the passage.

Hope that helps!

NotHermione
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Re: Useful Answers + Hot Tips From the Guy Who Got 3 180s

Postby NotHermione » Tue Apr 22, 2014 8:54 pm

Dave,

This June will be my third take (I cancelled my first take due to a bubbling error and then my second score was below my then PT average of 169). I'm scoring in the 170s now but am obviously feeling the pressure because this is my last shot. Any recommendations on building up confidence/shaking off my nerves before June?

daryldixon
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Re: Useful Answers + Hot Tips From the Guy Who Got 3 180s

Postby daryldixon » Tue Apr 22, 2014 8:56 pm

How was the lawsuit with testmasters resolved? Or did you have to sign an NDA?

Maple Leaf Canuck
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Re: Useful Answers + Hot Tips From the Guy Who Got 3 180s

Postby Maple Leaf Canuck » Wed Apr 23, 2014 9:41 am

Dave Hall wrote:
Maple Leaf Canuck wrote:Hello Dave,

I am new to the TLS Forums and am finding your insight very helpful. I have taken a Princeton Review prep course as well as read the Powerscore books. I am wondering what your thoughts are on reading the question stem prior to the stimulus? What would you advise?

Thank you for your help!

In the Logical Reasoning, I'm totally for it.

The question stem gives focus to my reading; if I've been asked simply to identify the Main Conclusion, I think differently (well, less) than if I need to identify a Flaw.

Ultimately, it doesn't matter too much (so, you know, do what makes you happy!), but it probably also makes you a little more efficient if you read the question first—you can likely remember a time when you read a passage, then read the question, then said "Crap. I don't know what was in that passage I just read."

Reading the question first helps eliminate some of that kind of duplicative experience by keeping you keyed to what's important the first time through the passage.

Hope that helps!


Thank you very much Dave for the advice. On my next PT I will use this method and see if there is an improvement in my score.

Cheers!

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guano
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Re: Useful Answers + Hot Tips From the Guy Who Got 3 180s

Postby guano » Wed Apr 23, 2014 10:22 am

Do you have any tips on how to improve my photoshop skills?

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Dave Hall
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Re: Useful Answers + Hot Tips From the Guy Who Got 3 180s

Postby Dave Hall » Thu Apr 24, 2014 12:08 am

NotHermione wrote:Dave,

This June will be my third take (I cancelled my first take due to a bubbling error and then my second score was below my then PT average of 169). I'm scoring in the 170s now but am obviously feeling the pressure because this is my last shot. Any recommendations on building up confidence/shaking off my nerves before June?

This is an important question, and (as you can probably imagine) one that I get a lot. You're not alone!

Since it seems to have deep and complex psychological roots, test-day anxiety is tough for me to crack. But here are some thoughts that might help:

1. Knowledge kills fear. If you know that you're ready for everything the test will ask, then you can relax a little, secure in the knowledge that there's nothing they can throw at you that you haven't seen before. Dedicated, focused practice is required to get to that place, but I believe you can do it.

2. Do some of your prep in the food court at the mall. If you can learn to think under those conditions, then you'll be able to deal more easily with the smaller noises and distractions of the other test takers around you on test day.

3. Many prep companies offer free practice exams - take advantage, just for the experience of sitting in a strange room, surrounded by strangers.

4. Learn and practice some visualization techniques: Picture yourself in the room on test day. In your head, walk through the entire experience of the day, from waiting in line, showing off your passport photo, to receiving the test booklet and listening to the inexorable drone of instructions, on through opening the seal with your pencil and turning the first page. Picture yourself owning that test. If you can see all of that, then once it happens, you'll already be in charge of it.

5. Find yourself a theme song. For my most recent test, I used "No Church in the Wild". You need something that kicks ass—you won't go wrong with "Eye of the Tiger". Play your song before every practice test you take, and play it on repeat as you drive to your test center on the day. YOU ARE ROCKY MOTHERF**ING BALBOA.

6. Remember that anxiety is an evolutionarily pre-programmed response. It's nature. You cannot expect to not feel nervous, and just saying to yourself "Hey, self, don't be nervous," won't stop it. Instead, recognize that the nerves are part of the experience, and that they will come, but that they do not get to win. The nerves don't mean anything. You are in control, and you will stay in control by allowing the anxiety to come on, recognizing it for the purely physical reaction that it is, and moving straight on past it.

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Dave Hall
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Re: Useful Answers + Hot Tips From the Guy Who Got 3 180s

Postby Dave Hall » Thu Apr 24, 2014 12:10 am

Maple Leaf Canuck wrote:Thank you very much Dave for the advice. On my next PT I will use this method and see if there is an improvement in my score.

Cheers!

My pleasure! Please do keep me posted; I'd like to hear how things go for you.

Let me know if you find you need help, too.

Straw_Mandible
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Re: Useful Answers + Hot Tips From the Guy Who Got 3 180s

Postby Straw_Mandible » Thu Apr 24, 2014 12:14 pm

Dave Hall wrote:
NotHermione wrote:Dave,

This June will be my third take (I cancelled my first take due to a bubbling error and then my second score was below my then PT average of 169). I'm scoring in the 170s now but am obviously feeling the pressure because this is my last shot. Any recommendations on building up confidence/shaking off my nerves before June?

This is an important question, and (as you can probably imagine) one that I get a lot. You're not alone!

Since it seems to have deep and complex psychological roots, test-day anxiety is tough for me to crack. But here are some thoughts that might help:

1. Knowledge kills fear. If you know that you're ready for everything the test will ask, then you can relax a little, secure in the knowledge that there's nothing they can throw at you that you haven't seen before. Dedicated, focused practice is required to get to that place, but I believe you can do it.

2. Do some of your prep in the food court at the mall. If you can learn to think under those conditions, then you'll be able to deal more easily with the smaller noises and distractions of the other test takers around you on test day.

3. Many prep companies offer free practice exams - take advantage, just for the experience of sitting in a strange room, surrounded by strangers.

4. Learn and practice some visualization techniques: Picture yourself in the room on test day. In your head, walk through the entire experience of the day, from waiting in line, showing off your passport photo, to receiving the test booklet and listening to the inexorable drone of instructions, on through opening the seal with your pencil and turning the first page. Picture yourself owning that test. If you can see all of that, then once it happens, you'll already be in charge of it.

5. Find yourself a theme song. For my most recent test, I used "No Church in the Wild". You need something that kicks ass—you won't go wrong with "Eye of the Tiger". Play your song before every practice test you take, and play it on repeat as you drive to your test center on the day. YOU ARE ROCKY MOTHERF**ING BALBOA.

6. Remember that anxiety is an evolutionarily pre-programmed response. It's nature. You cannot expect to not feel nervous, and just saying to yourself "Hey, self, don't be nervous," won't stop it. Instead, recognize that the nerves are part of the experience, and that they will come, but that they do not get to win. The nerves don't mean anything. You are in control, and you will stay in control by allowing the anxiety to come on, recognizing it for the purely physical reaction that it is, and moving straight on past it.


Just dropping in to say that this is an amazing post. Dave, you're a visionary.

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Dave Hall
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Re: Useful Answers + Hot Tips From the Guy Who Got 3 180s

Postby Dave Hall » Mon Apr 28, 2014 9:43 pm

Straw_Mandible wrote:
Dave Hall wrote:
NotHermione wrote:Dave,

This June will be my third take (I cancelled my first take due to a bubbling error and then my second score was below my then PT average of 169). I'm scoring in the 170s now but am obviously feeling the pressure because this is my last shot. Any recommendations on building up confidence/shaking off my nerves before June?

This is an important question, and (as you can probably imagine) one that I get a lot. You're not alone!

Since it seems to have deep and complex psychological roots, test-day anxiety is tough for me to crack. But here are some thoughts that might help:

1. Knowledge kills fear. If you know that you're ready for everything the test will ask, then you can relax a little, secure in the knowledge that there's nothing they can throw at you that you haven't seen before. Dedicated, focused practice is required to get to that place, but I believe you can do it.

2. Do some of your prep in the food court at the mall. If you can learn to think under those conditions, then you'll be able to deal more easily with the smaller noises and distractions of the other test takers around you on test day.

3. Many prep companies offer free practice exams - take advantage, just for the experience of sitting in a strange room, surrounded by strangers.

4. Learn and practice some visualization techniques: Picture yourself in the room on test day. In your head, walk through the entire experience of the day, from waiting in line, showing off your passport photo, to receiving the test booklet and listening to the inexorable drone of instructions, on through opening the seal with your pencil and turning the first page. Picture yourself owning that test. If you can see all of that, then once it happens, you'll already be in charge of it.

5. Find yourself a theme song. For my most recent test, I used "No Church in the Wild". You need something that kicks ass—you won't go wrong with "Eye of the Tiger". Play your song before every practice test you take, and play it on repeat as you drive to your test center on the day. YOU ARE ROCKY MOTHERF**ING BALBOA.

6. Remember that anxiety is an evolutionarily pre-programmed response. It's nature. You cannot expect to not feel nervous, and just saying to yourself "Hey, self, don't be nervous," won't stop it. Instead, recognize that the nerves are part of the experience, and that they will come, but that they do not get to win. The nerves don't mean anything. You are in control, and you will stay in control by allowing the anxiety to come on, recognizing it for the purely physical reaction that it is, and moving straight on past it.


Just dropping in to say that this is an amazing post. Dave, you're a visionary.

Well, that was a lovely thing to say. Thank you very much.

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Dave Hall
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Re: Useful Answers + Hot Tips From the Guy Who Got 3 180s

Postby Dave Hall » Mon Apr 28, 2014 9:44 pm

I got a private message about Reading Comp today, and I figure the messager is not the only one with this question, so I'm reposting my reply here:

Hot Tip: Practical Practice for Reading Comp.

Name Redacted wrote:Hey Dave,

I'll make this quick. Basically, I suck at reading comp, and I've been drilling reading comp but feel like I'm getting nothing out of it, not close to the amount I do for LR and LG. How would you suggest drilling and reviewing reading comprehension?

Thanks a lot in advance. Take care.

Name Redacted


Hi, Name Redacted,

For Reading Comp, generally, it's the answer choices, not the questions, that make the tasks hard. Answers are written deliberately to seem attractive when they're wrong, and to look ugly when they're right. You can go a long way toward short-circuiting those traps by disciplining yourself to always answer the question based on the passage before you look at any answer choices.

This does two things:

1. Forces you to learn how to properly answer questions (you'll have to learn to stop relying on answer choices, and instead work from the passage itself).
2. Makes you significantly faster over the long run. The place most people waste the most time is weighing answer choices. If you already know what the passage says on the matter, your choice will usually be faster (and more accurate!).

To accomplish these things, get some 3x5 notecards and use them to cover the answer choices. As you work a passage, instead of choosing an answer choice, write down on the card what the passage indicates is the right answer. Only once you've answered each question in the passage this way can you lift the card and choose the answer choice that matches your answer.

I can see a clear straight path from getting good at answering RC questions to being fast at it. It's much harder for me to visualize an avenue for success that doesn't include a disciplined approach to getting questions right.

d

jmjm
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Re: Useful Answers + Hot Tips From the Guy Who Got 3 180s

Postby jmjm » Tue May 20, 2014 5:01 pm

Hey dave,

Do you believe that in strengthen/weaken questions only one answer choice strengthens/weakens respectively the argument by even a little bit like some experts (shinners) believe? If so, can you discuss why 55.LR1.22 B and 55.LR1.23 A is wrong.

Superprep-B.LR1.21 seems wrong as the necessary assumption doesn't have to preclude
All noneconomic factors? The explanation offered in the book doesn't address this.

Thanks

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Dave Hall
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Re: Useful Answers + Hot Tips From the Guy Who Got 3 180s

Postby Dave Hall » Fri May 23, 2014 7:41 pm

jmjm wrote:Hey dave,

Do you believe that in strengthen/weaken questions only one answer choice strengthens/weakens respectively the argument by even a little bit like some experts (shinners) believe? If so, can you discuss why 55.LR1.22 B and 55.LR1.23 A is wrong.

Superprep-B.LR1.21 seems wrong as the necessary assumption doesn't have to preclude
All noneconomic factors? The explanation offered in the book doesn't address this.

Thanks

No, I don't.

I think we can find other examples in which wrong answers do seem to provide at least some support for (or evidence against) the argument. In fact, LSAC seems specifically to attempt to inoculate themselves against this very possibility both in the language of the instructions ("...though more than one choice may conceivably answer the question...") and the language of the question stem ("...does most to..." or "...most strengthens [or weakens]...").

So, no, I don't think it's impossible for a wrong answer to offer at least some modicum of support (indeed, we have some evidence that this may happen on occasion). Still, over the vast majority of questions, this is not the case; you'll almost always find one answer that does the job and four that simply do not. So don't let the possibility of the rare exception distract you from the fact of the great majority (this would be something akin to letting the perfect become the enemy of the good).

To your particular questions:

55.1.22

I don't find (B) particularly compelling for two reasons:

1. We have no idea whether the correlation discussed in the passage includes people who take medication. If it doesn't, then (B) doesn't matter at all.

2. We have no indication from (B) in what way moods are affected; if the effect is one of increased tranquility, then again, (B) doesn't hurt at all.

In order for (B) to work, then, we'd really need to add two pieces of evidence to it. Without those assumptions, it doesn't carry much (any?) water.

55.1.23

Again, I don't find (A) particularly persuasive. I understand your attraction; if it's happening in other places, then it may not be a fluke of the business professor's classes. However, noting only that "several" other students behave similarly doesn't provide much by way of support. How many is "several"?

Because if we're talking about 6 additional students, then we haven't really done anything appreciable to help the argument.

Again, remember that in both of these questions, we've been specifically asked not which of the five weakens or strengthens, but which most weakens or strengthens. So it's certainly academically possible to assert that some choice/s other than the right answer do something to help or to hurt, but that doesn't change the fact that those other answer choices are still all wrong; they are all demonstrably less effective than is the credited response. Make sense?

B.1.21

So, the first doctrine says the explanation is always economic. The author says that's incorrect because the explanation is sometimes economic and psychological.

But so what?

The first doctrine never said the explanations are only economic! It just said that they're always economic; maybe sometimes they're economic and also other things, too.

The author has confused the words always and only, and has acted as though the first doctrine said that explanations were only economic.

If that's what the first doctrine had in fact said, then, yeah; pointing out that it's not only economic would've been devastating. But that's not what the first doctrine said; it's just something the author has assumed.

Let me know if you need more!

d

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Re: Useful Answers + Hot Tips From the Guy Who Got 3 180s

Postby jmjm » Fri May 23, 2014 9:35 pm

Thanks for the strengthen/weaken question explanation. Does "tend to" indicate correlation or causation? The way it's used in Q 22 doesn't seem clear and threw me off.

In B.1.21, yes the author is saying that doctine-1 is mistaken because it says that the explanation is always economic. Assuming that first doctrine precludes all non-economic factors (choice A) justifies the conclusion. Choice A is sufficient but is it necessary?

For example, non-economic factors can include both psychological and environmental factors. What A is saying is that for the conclusion to be drawn we must assume that all non-economic factors (psycho and environ) must be precluded by the doctrine. But it doesn't have to be so. Doctrine-1 can appeal to environmental factors along with economic factors and still be mistaken.
So negating A by saying that the first doctrine appeals to economic and environmental factors doesn't break the argument.

A correct necessary assumption could be "the first doctrine precludes any psychological factors in explanations of historical events". Since the question asks for an assumption the argument depends on, isn't then choice A as-is incorrect.

cavalier2015
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Re: Useful Answers + Hot Tips From the Guy Who Got 3 180s

Postby cavalier2015 » Fri May 23, 2014 10:29 pm

how do you attack sufficient assumption questions? i am able to get the level 1 and 2 questions right in the cambridge packet but am having trouble with the 3s and 4s.

chrijani
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Re: Useful Answers + Hot Tips From the Guy Who Got 3 180s

Postby chrijani » Sun May 25, 2014 11:49 am

I'm not familiar with the classifications you're referencing, so I will assume that "level four" just means "harder".

With that assumption in mind, two things:

1. Have you ever played a sport? If you have, then you'll remember that your practices sometimes involved scrimmages or sparring or practice games/matches/bouts, but more often involved skill drills. In other words, you spent a little bit of practice actually playing your sport, but you spent most of your practice time developing skills and traits that either directly impacted your abilities (batting practice, for example) or even indirectly enhanced your performance (wind sprints, for example).

This is like that.

Your practice sessions should never be about speed; that's what timed tests are good for measuring. Instead, all your practice sessions should be about building skills that will directly impact your ability on test day. Just this subtle shift in focus may be enough to make a substantial—and meaningful—impact on the way in which you study. This change is aimed toward getting you to understand the LSAT. Because if you really understand what the test is asking you to do, you're immediately better able to provide answers that earn you points.

2. With that in mind, I'd direct your focus specifically toward developing a strong sense of pattern recognition. With small exception (maybe 5-ish% of test questions), every question on this test looks just like a whole host of other questions already asked on this test. This is true almost by definition; it's a standardized test, so it has to be... standardized. Make it your job to figure out ways in which each new question you answer is like other questions you've seen before (and will see in future).

To help you do that, here is a set of actions for you to take with your work (if you already know the answers to these questions, you might still want to do this as a review):

Part (A)

Go through an entire LR section, looking at each question. For each one, answer the following questions:

1. What exactly does the question demand from you? (You must be able to answer for 26 of the 26 questions)

2. What can you expect the right answer to do? (You must be able to answer for 26 of the 26 questions)

3. What can you expect the right answer to sound like? (You must be able to answer for at least 22 of the 26 questions)

4. What is one wrong answer likely to say? (You must be able to answer for 26 of the 26 questions)

Part (B)

Then, go back through that section (without bothering with questions this time) and read each passage. For each, answer the following questions:

1. What is the main conclusion of the argument? (You must be able to answer for at least 20 of the 26 passages - no main conclusion for Inference and Resolution Questions!)

2. What is wrong with the argument? (You must be able to answer for at least 16 of the 26 passages - several passages don't exhibit flawed reasoning)

3. How is this flaw typical of others you've seen? (You must be able to answer for at least 10 of the 16-19 passages that exhibit flaws)

4. Which words are likely to be most important in determining the correct answer (no matter what question you might be asked)? (You must be able to answer for at least 20 of the 26 questions)

If you cannot answer all eight of these questions in the proportions indicated, then you do not yet have a strong enough grasp of the fundamental principles involved, and you'll know what you need to work on!


Hey Dave,

I realize you posted the above information a little while ago, but if possible I have a few questions regarding it.
First, going through the LR and doing that type of analysis is not an issue for me, but how do I know if I am RIGHT when I am answering the questions? Is there anything I can refer to other than the answer choice to determine my ability in answering all 8 questions.
Second, when your not timing yourself as you practice drills, at what point are you able to "move on" past questions. Sometimes I find myself with questions that I can eliminate 2-3 answer choices, and pick between two answer choice, not knowing why I eliminated 1 but knowing why I chose one. Which in some cases is not always right, so how do deal with some of the answer choices you just can't eliminate so you basically guess which one sounds best.

Ps: your posts on TLS and your website/videos are absolutely amazing! Thank you so much for supporting us noobs!

Thanks,
Christian

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Dave Hall
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Re: Useful Answers + Hot Tips From the Guy Who Got 3 180s

Postby Dave Hall » Mon Jun 02, 2014 9:38 pm

cavalier2015 wrote:how do you attack sufficient assumption questions? i am able to get the level 1 and 2 questions right in the cambridge packet but am having trouble with the 3s and 4s.

These questions demand of you that you provide an answer that, if true, would be sufficient to prove that the argument's conclusion is true. And proof? That means that it's impossible for that conclusion to be false.

That's a really big job. Think about what that means: how do you do that?

I mean, how do you prove, in a sentence, that some claim is true? It would take some heavy-duty information to do that, right?

So, expect that the right answer to a Sufficient Assumption question will be big. Expect it to employ what I call Load-Bearing language (the kind of language that can bear the burden of proof).

Words like all and always and never and every and only. Also superlatives - words like best and first and smartest and weakest and surest.

When choosing between two answer choices for a Sufficient Assumption question, choose the more-aggressively worded choice.

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Re: Useful Answers + Hot Tips From the Guy Who Got 3 180s

Postby Dave Hall » Mon Jun 02, 2014 9:47 pm

jmjm wrote:Thanks for the strengthen/weaken question explanation. Does "tend to" indicate correlation or causation? The way it's used in Q 22 doesn't seem clear and threw me off.

In B.1.21, yes the author is saying that doctine-1 is mistaken because it says that the explanation is always economic. Assuming that first doctrine precludes all non-economic factors (choice A) justifies the conclusion. Choice A is sufficient but is it necessary?

For example, non-economic factors can include both psychological and environmental factors. What A is saying is that for the conclusion to be drawn we must assume that all non-economic factors (psycho and environ) must be precluded by the doctrine. But it doesn't have to be so. Doctrine-1 can appeal to environmental factors along with economic factors and still be mistaken.
So negating A by saying that the first doctrine appeals to economic and environmental factors doesn't break the argument.

A correct necessary assumption could be "the first doctrine precludes any psychological factors in explanations of historical events". Since the question asks for an assumption the argument depends on, isn't then choice A as-is incorrect.

This is all technically true, but it seems the opposite of helpful.

You want to be faster at the test? You have to start seeing the forest. To me, this question was very easy, because after reading the passage I said to myself, "Dave [that's what I call myself when I'm talking to myself], this ass-hat has confused an explanation always being economic for it only being economic."

When (A) said exactly that, it was but the work of a mo' to quickly ascertain the other answers were all garbage, then I was on my merry way, correct answer in hand, without a care in the world.

I'm not dismissing your analysis.

But there's another equally true (and I'd say also larger and more important) sense in which simply to contend that the presence of any other individual factor counts as evidence against the claim is to involve oneself in the assumption that any single factor is capable of harming the claim. And to do that, one must assume that the claim speaks only to economic factors.

See the forest, young Skywalker, and you won't get so caught up in the individual trees.

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Re: Useful Answers + Hot Tips From the Guy Who Got 3 180s

Postby Dave Hall » Mon Jun 02, 2014 10:07 pm

chrijani wrote:Hey Dave,

I realize you posted the above information a little while ago, but if possible I have a few questions regarding it.
First, going through the LR and doing that type of analysis is not an issue for me, but how do I know if I am RIGHT when I am answering the questions? Is there anything I can refer to other than the answer choice to determine my ability in answering all 8 questions.


Trial and error!

This is sort of my point with this advice; that everything I'll do for you in my course is what you could do yourself by working through old tests with the mindset partially described by these questions.

So, if you're asking yourself these questions, then developing answers for them, you will be building your own test prep system. Bitchin', right?

So, even if there's some technical glitch in your approach that should ACTUALLY [*snorts, pushes glasses up nose] be considered incorrect, as long as it's yielding results, why would you care? You wouldn't!

You may not develop the same system I did, but experience will tell you whether your system works. And working is what we're after, right?

chrijani wrote:Second, when your not timing yourself as you practice drills, at what point are you able to "move on" past questions. Sometimes I find myself with questions that I can eliminate 2-3 answer choices, and pick between two answer choice, not knowing why I eliminated 1 but knowing why I chose one. Which in some cases is not always right, so how do deal with some of the answer choices you just can't eliminate so you basically guess which one sounds best.


Write it down! Whatever reason you have—even if it's basically a guess—comes from somewhere. If you force yourself to write down your thoughts, you'll be able to begin the confirmation process on thoughts that got results, and to correct your thinking when your thoughts led you astray.

Just the simple act of writing it down goes a long way toward clarifying your process. And once you've got a clear process, you can move forward!

chrijani wrote:Ps: your posts on TLS and your website/videos are absolutely amazing! Thank you so much for supporting us noobs!

Thanks,
Christian

Thanks, Christian. That's nice of you to say.

I'm happy to help.

jmjm
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Re: Useful Answers + Hot Tips From the Guy Who Got 3 180s

Postby jmjm » Tue Jun 03, 2014 2:24 am

Dave Hall wrote:But there's another equally true (and I'd say also larger and more important) sense in which simply to contend that the presence of any other individual factor counts as evidence against the claim is to involve oneself in the assumption that any single factor is capable of harming the claim. And to do that, one must assume that the claim speaks only to economic factors.


Thanks for your help with this Q. I'm probably missing something in your explanation above, could you explain what you mean by it? Negating (A) by contending the presence of other individual factor (environ) doesn't harm the claim and so (A) didn't look like a nece assumption to me.

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PrepTest 72 Game 4 Explanation Is Up and Is Free

Postby Dave Hall » Wed Jul 02, 2014 3:20 am

Hey, guys,

Congratulations for making it through the June test.

To celebrate the release of scores, we've uploaded free explanations for every game (we started with Game 4 because I know that's what you had trouble with; the others will upload and populate the site overnight).

The video is free, and it's here.

I'll continue recording explanations for every question from this test and making those available to you over the next couple of days. I'll post to this thread as things become available online.

Questions? Comments?

Sock 'em to me.

d

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Dave Hall
Posts: 583
Joined: Thu Jul 28, 2011 4:18 pm

Re: Useful Answers + Hot Tips From the Guy Who Got 3 180s

Postby Dave Hall » Wed Jul 02, 2014 3:27 am

Hey, guys,

I'm posting free video responses to all the questions from PrepTest 72.

I started with Game 4 (find it here), and we'll keep uploading new files tomorrow (and maybe Thursday? Probably not Thursday. But maybe?).

Meantime, if you have questions about that test, now that I've got it IN MY CLUTCHES, I'm here to help.

Lemme know,

d

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flash21
Posts: 1536
Joined: Fri Apr 19, 2013 8:56 pm

Re: Useful Answers + Hot Tips From the Guy Who Got 3 180s

Postby flash21 » Wed Jul 02, 2014 2:19 pm

.
Last edited by flash21 on Thu Jul 03, 2014 5:31 pm, edited 1 time in total.

03152016
Posts: 9189
Joined: Wed Dec 21, 2011 3:14 am

Re: PrepTest 72 Game 4 Explanation Is Up and Is Free

Postby 03152016 » Wed Jul 02, 2014 6:01 pm

hey aren't you that guy who lied about his LSAT score and then got sued for it

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WaltGrace83
Posts: 719
Joined: Fri Apr 12, 2013 5:55 pm

Re: PrepTest 72 Game 4 Explanation Is Up and Is Free

Postby WaltGrace83 » Wed Jul 02, 2014 6:34 pm

Brut wrote:hey aren't you that guy who lied about his LSAT score and then got sued for it


C'mon, man. That's a bit uncalled for.


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