Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

A forum for applicants and admitted students to ask law students and graduates about law school and the practice of law.
tgmi123

New
Posts: 3
Joined: Mon Sep 17, 2018 10:35 pm

Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby tgmi123 » Mon Sep 17, 2018 10:39 pm

I'm currently in Nesson's Fair Trial. The class is interesting but I'm also a bit confused by it. Do people have insights about how grading works in this class? I've occasionally heard that it's an "easy H" class but have heard more often that grading is completely random and a bunch of people end up w/ Ps. If the latter, any ideas on how to do well in the class?

User avatar
Dcc617

Gold
Posts: 2342
Joined: Mon Oct 13, 2014 3:01 pm

Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby Dcc617 » Tue Sep 18, 2018 8:38 am

tgmi123 wrote:I'm currently in Nesson's Fair Trial. The class is interesting but I'm also a bit confused by it. Do people have insights about how grading works in this class? I've occasionally heard that it's an "easy H" class but have heard more often that grading is completely random and a bunch of people end up w/ Ps. If the latter, any ideas on how to do well in the class?


I took a Nesson class last semester. Just lean back, show up when you can, and chill. I'm pretty sure everyone got an H, maybe unless you straight up never showed up and barely turned in a final.

kdxsam

New
Posts: 9
Joined: Fri Apr 21, 2017 11:22 pm

Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby kdxsam » Tue Oct 23, 2018 12:22 am

Can anyone share their experience of cross-registering a class at HBS? How's the experience/work load/grading?

hlsperson1111

Bronze
Posts: 408
Joined: Sun Jul 22, 2012 11:10 pm

Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby hlsperson1111 » Fri Nov 02, 2018 5:18 pm

Dcc617 wrote:
tgmi123 wrote:I'm currently in Nesson's Fair Trial. The class is interesting but I'm also a bit confused by it. Do people have insights about how grading works in this class? I've occasionally heard that it's an "easy H" class but have heard more often that grading is completely random and a bunch of people end up w/ Ps. If the latter, any ideas on how to do well in the class?


I took a Nesson class last semester. Just lean back, show up when you can, and chill. I'm pretty sure everyone got an H, maybe unless you straight up never showed up and barely turned in a final.


For whatever it's worth, I got a P from Nesson, and I had around a 3:1 H:P ratio in law school. I think his grading is very random and his classes are a waste of time, but maybe I'm just bitter.

tgmi123

New
Posts: 3
Joined: Mon Sep 17, 2018 10:35 pm

Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby tgmi123 » Mon Nov 12, 2018 2:48 pm

hlsperson1111 wrote:
Dcc617 wrote:
tgmi123 wrote:I'm currently in Nesson's Fair Trial. The class is interesting but I'm also a bit confused by it. Do people have insights about how grading works in this class? I've occasionally heard that it's an "easy H" class but have heard more often that grading is completely random and a bunch of people end up w/ Ps. If the latter, any ideas on how to do well in the class?


I took a Nesson class last semester. Just lean back, show up when you can, and chill. I'm pretty sure everyone got an H, maybe unless you straight up never showed up and barely turned in a final.


For whatever it's worth, I got a P from Nesson, and I had around a 3:1 H:P ratio in law school. I think his grading is very random and his classes are a waste of time, but maybe I'm just bitter.


Definitely getting the sense that grading is random. Did you attend most classes and participate in discussions? Did you put a lot of effort into the final paper? Thanks.

hlsperson1111

Bronze
Posts: 408
Joined: Sun Jul 22, 2012 11:10 pm

Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby hlsperson1111 » Mon Nov 12, 2018 6:38 pm

tgmi123 wrote:
hlsperson1111 wrote:
Dcc617 wrote:
tgmi123 wrote:I'm currently in Nesson's Fair Trial. The class is interesting but I'm also a bit confused by it. Do people have insights about how grading works in this class? I've occasionally heard that it's an "easy H" class but have heard more often that grading is completely random and a bunch of people end up w/ Ps. If the latter, any ideas on how to do well in the class?


I took a Nesson class last semester. Just lean back, show up when you can, and chill. I'm pretty sure everyone got an H, maybe unless you straight up never showed up and barely turned in a final.


For whatever it's worth, I got a P from Nesson, and I had around a 3:1 H:P ratio in law school. I think his grading is very random and his classes are a waste of time, but maybe I'm just bitter.


Definitely getting the sense that grading is random. Did you attend most classes and participate in discussions? Did you put a lot of effort into the final paper? Thanks.


I admittedly did not attend class that often. I went less as the semester dragged on. I had him for evidence, which had an exam rather than a paper. One question was given out in advance and we were encouraged to put together an answer before the exam. The other question was "What did you learn from this class?" I don't claim to have worked especially hard, but still . . .

tgmi123

New
Posts: 3
Joined: Mon Sep 17, 2018 10:35 pm

Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby tgmi123 » Mon Nov 12, 2018 9:23 pm

hlsperson1111 wrote:
tgmi123 wrote:
hlsperson1111 wrote:
Dcc617 wrote:
tgmi123 wrote:I'm currently in Nesson's Fair Trial. The class is interesting but I'm also a bit confused by it. Do people have insights about how grading works in this class? I've occasionally heard that it's an "easy H" class but have heard more often that grading is completely random and a bunch of people end up w/ Ps. If the latter, any ideas on how to do well in the class?


I took a Nesson class last semester. Just lean back, show up when you can, and chill. I'm pretty sure everyone got an H, maybe unless you straight up never showed up and barely turned in a final.


For whatever it's worth, I got a P from Nesson, and I had around a 3:1 H:P ratio in law school. I think his grading is very random and his classes are a waste of time, but maybe I'm just bitter.


Definitely getting the sense that grading is random. Did you attend most classes and participate in discussions? Did you put a lot of effort into the final paper? Thanks.


I admittedly did not attend class that often. I went less as the semester dragged on. I had him for evidence, which had an exam rather than a paper. One question was given out in advance and we were encouraged to put together an answer before the exam. The other question was "What did you learn from this class?" I don't claim to have worked especially hard, but still . . .


Thanks for the reply! Was the Evidence class large enough to be subject to the curve?

Lolstudent

New
Posts: 69
Joined: Wed May 30, 2018 1:34 am

Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby Lolstudent » Wed Nov 14, 2018 4:32 pm

What's a painless way to get the writing requirement fulfilled? My Ames team and I wrote the three briefs needed to get half of the Option 2 requirement checked off, but I still need one faculty-supervised paper. Any classes you'd recommend? Thanks in advance!

User avatar
Pneumonia

Gold
Posts: 1935
Joined: Sun Jul 29, 2012 3:05 pm

Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby Pneumonia » Wed Nov 14, 2018 11:33 pm

Lolstudent wrote:What's a painless way to get the writing requirement fulfilled? My Ames team and I wrote the three briefs needed to get half of the Option 2 requirement checked off, but I still need one faculty-supervised paper. Any classes you'd recommend? Thanks in advance!

It doesn't have to be a paper, it just has to be 15 pages from a single course or seminar (so no reading groups). Here's the language: "law school course and seminar papers, including the standard series of reaction papers, amounting to no fewer than 15 pages."

Assuming no journal work, the most painless option is to satisfy the requirement with something you would be doing already. For example--
    -Negotiation Workshop requires a final paper in lieu of exam;
    -Some Legal Profession classes allow a final paper in lieu of exam (this is probably the easiest option (i) because LP is required and (ii) because you satisfy the requirement and get out of an exam by doing it).

Beyond these or similar options your best bet is just to take a seminar and maker sure you hit 15 pages total.

User avatar
TripTrip

Gold
Posts: 2766
Joined: Fri Sep 07, 2012 9:52 am

Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby TripTrip » Thu Nov 15, 2018 12:16 am

Pro-tip: It's hard to get a "P" in your seminar if you use it as your Option 2 paper and work with your professor on it.

tcav223

New
Posts: 1
Joined: Tue Aug 01, 2017 3:27 pm

Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby tcav223 » Thu Nov 15, 2018 12:13 pm

anyone know if feldman still gives LPs?

mn40

New
Posts: 17
Joined: Thu Jan 23, 2014 11:49 pm

Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby mn40 » Tue Dec 11, 2018 1:45 am

Do 2Ls have to wait until late January for all of our grades to be released at once like 1Ls? Or do they trickle in individually as professors complete their grading?

User avatar
Dcc617

Gold
Posts: 2342
Joined: Mon Oct 13, 2014 3:01 pm

Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby Dcc617 » Tue Dec 11, 2018 4:35 am

mn40 wrote:Do 2Ls have to wait until late January for all of our grades to be released at once like 1Ls? Or do they trickle in individually as professors complete their grading?


Most will come out at the deadline, some will be later.

mn40

New
Posts: 17
Joined: Thu Jan 23, 2014 11:49 pm

Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby mn40 » Tue Dec 11, 2018 11:47 am

Thanks. To clarify, that means that 2Ls/3Ls will generally get grades before 1Ls, right? If I remember correctly, the deadline to submit was a few weeks before 1L grades were released en masse?

User avatar
EnderWiggin

Silver
Posts: 1217
Joined: Wed Nov 12, 2014 9:55 pm

Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby EnderWiggin » Tue Dec 11, 2018 12:07 pm

mn40 wrote:Thanks. To clarify, that means that 2Ls/3Ls will generally get grades before 1Ls, right? If I remember correctly, the deadline to submit was a few weeks before 1L grades were released en masse?


No. Fall grades for all students have historically been released all at once (usually during the first week of the spring semester).

oranger

New
Posts: 4
Joined: Tue Apr 03, 2018 10:50 am

Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby oranger » Tue Dec 11, 2018 11:43 pm

Anyone know if Nesson gives out LPs? I feel like I could end up with either a DS, LP or anything in between. No idea.

inquinate123

New
Posts: 1
Joined: Wed Dec 12, 2018 6:53 pm

Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby inquinate123 » Wed Dec 12, 2018 6:56 pm

Does anyone know if Jesse Fried gives LP's in Corporations? I pretty much peaced out of Cambridge all semester and haven't attended most classes, starting to get a little worried. Appreciate any insight from anyone who knows anything about it.

User avatar
Dcc617

Gold
Posts: 2342
Joined: Mon Oct 13, 2014 3:01 pm

Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby Dcc617 » Thu Dec 13, 2018 2:42 am

tcav223 wrote:anyone know if feldman still gives LPs?


He does.

kdxsam

New
Posts: 9
Joined: Fri Apr 21, 2017 11:22 pm

Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby kdxsam » Thu Dec 13, 2018 11:22 pm

inquinate123 wrote:Does anyone know if Jesse Fried gives LP's in Corporations?


Well, in the last day of class he told everyone to "chillax." He also said he's generous with the curve and that he only failed one person in 20 years of teaching. Didn't say if he gives out LPs though.

UpstairsNapkin

New
Posts: 1
Joined: Sat Dec 15, 2018 2:43 am

Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby UpstairsNapkin » Sat Dec 15, 2018 4:38 am

Splurgles23 wrote:
khaosan17 wrote:Dear 2Ls and 3Ls,

How wide would you say is the range in intellectual capacity within a section?

Are you bound to have 2~3 students in the section who just stand out and you know you can never outperform them?

Even at HLS, are you bound to see “smart” kids who are just in a league of their own?

Thanks.



The law is not like math, or physics (or even creative writing): being in a "league of their own" is a thing in terms of work ethic and perseverance. It's not a coincidence that some kids will have almost all H's and DS's and almost no P's, but it also won't be a matter of some intrinsic intellectual brilliance: it will be a combination of intelligence, work ethic, and access to resources. But yes, it's true that some kids will outpace the others in their overall combination of this package.

The other thing I will say (as a transfer to HLS) is that it's true that, unlike my other school (a lower T-14), *no one* at HLS is not smart (ie, someone who just worked hard to get to law school).


The bolded is just not true. To the extent that you are just drawing a generalization that overall, people at the top of the class will tend to have gotten there through hard work and perseverance, then sure. But, it really seems like you are making a blanket statement that law school is not something that one excels at through sheer brilliance (unlike, in your opinion, math/physics).

I don't share this stuff lightly, and I'm posting this from a burner account because I'm pretty sure a couple people on this forum could identify me and/or this person from this info, but I wanted to speak up because over the past couple years I have seen quite a few posts asserting this (or very similar) viewpoints, and they never go unchallenged, and I can tell you with complete certainty that law school is something that can be excelled at simply through having outlier intelligence (I'm talking about true outlier intelligence, not just "oh i score in the 99th percentile" intelligence).

A good friend of mine has a GPA above 4.5 (mostly DS's, smattering of Hs), although only attending approximately 10% of all of their law school classes, with most of that attendance coming from the first semester of law school (for instance, this semester they just took an exam for a class that they literally never attended once; they wouldn't have been able to pick the professor out of a random lineup). They spend their time throughout the whole semester playing videogames and generally just hanging out, and then during reading week they learn the entirety of the class material and ace all their exams. For example (and the way I found out about all this), 1L year I went over to their apartment soon after classes let out to talk about a property practice exam with them. They were completely useless--knew next to nothing about the subject. They said they needed some time to learn the material and proposed we meet up again in two days. We did, and it was like a completely different person; they seemed to have complete mastery of the material. Our exam was a few days later and they ended up getting a DS in the class. Note that this was 1L year, so they also had 3 other exams that they had to be doing this for as well.

Furthermore, this doesn't just extend to exam-based classes. I have taken paper-based classes with this person and seen them write the entirety of their term paper the day it is due; I was even their partner for 1L Ames and they did basically the same thing for our brief (although modified somewhat to accommodate working with me), which, yes, they got a DS on.

To get the best idea of this person, you should basically imagine Good Will Hunting, both in terms of intellect and (especially) attitude. They legit just don't care about law school (or seemingly any kind of career ambitions) and seem to be getting these top grades because somehow it is actually the path of least resistance for them. They did not do law review (or any journal for that matter), are not a part of any student org, and aren't clerking. In fact, people from HLS contacted them early on about placing them into feeder clerkships, and they straight up brushed those people off completely: not interested. This included our Climenko Fellow who straight up told my friend they could give her/him a great shot at clerking with the SCOTUS Justice that our Fellow had previously clerked for. This person just legit doesn't give a shit.

Another reason I bring up the comparisons to Good Will Hunting is specifically because of what you said about law school not being like math/physics, which I took to mean that it doesn't lend itself to the same kind of savant-type ability to excel. But here is the thing: I have actually talked about this quite a bit with my friend, and they think there are actually substantial similarities. First of all, my friend is undoubtedly what we would consider a math savant. I'm trying not to identify this person too closely, but suffice to say that they have some connection with people in the physics grad department at Harvard and I have been around them speaking together and heard him talk with ridiculous authority on some of the stuff. They clearly have a very advanced understanding of math despite not having ever taken advanced classes (their undergrad degree is not in STEM). I have seen a number of varied examples that make me supremely confident that they are a math savant, including them being given a math problem from a field that they had no knowledge of, and then essentially teaching themselves the math through solving the problem itself. To this day, that is one of the more ridiculous things I have seen in my life. Also, almost as an aside, they almost certainly have a photographic memory. I thought they probably did, and so one time I gave them 30 seconds to memorize the first fifty digits of pi, which they recited back with ease.

They have noted many times before that math problems and law exams are really not fundamentally different to them, that they are both (in their words) very formulaic and at their core just require simple parsing and logic gates to solve optimally. Furthermore, from what I have seen, I think grades in law school are exactly the kind of thing that plays into the hands of these types. Blind-grading: to the extent this person even does go to class, they never participate; I don't recall them ever volunteering any comment or question for the entirety of 1L (we were in the same section). Entirety of grade based on one single exam: lends itself to the "slack-off then cram" mindset; if grades were more project-based or reliant on things turned in throughout the semester they probably wouldn't do as well (they told me they failed some of their high school classes simply because homework and various assignments were weighted heavily and they never did them). Exams themselves: very formulaic, don't require much (if any) creative thinking.

All this to say, there is a major tendency to think that everyone struggles with law school, and that even those who are excelling are having a hard time, and are probably excelling in major part due to hard work rather than simply being smarter than the average HLS student. There also seems to be a common conception that most law students who act like they aren't studying/working hard are some sort of "secret gunners" who are really just concealing the extent to which they work. I'm not saying that these generalizations don't hold true for the most part, but that they are certainly not absolute, which is why it irks me a bit when I see people throw out these ideas as absolute all the time. For instance, I remember a while back in this thread (right after exams, when everyone was worrying and trying to predict grades) someone said that "literally no one knows how they did when they walk out of a law school exam," as if it were some absolute truth. That cracked me up because I remembered talking with my friend after 1st semester of 1L exams had just finished. We were talking about how we thought we did and my friend said that they knew that they got a DS in 4 specific classes, but in one class they thought they could have gotten anything from an LP to a DS because the exam was too ambiguous or something like that. When grades came out it turned out they got 4DS and 1H, with the H coming in the class they admitted to having no idea as to how they performed. Now, I understand that you may argue that this is confirmation/hindsight bias, but with everything I know of this person, I think it is much more likely that (contrary to the absolute "truism" stated on these boards) my friend just legitimately knew exactly how they did on the exams.

As to OP, I would say that the range of "intellectual capacity" in a section is really not meaningful at all. For the most part people fall into a completely undifferentiated mass of "fairly smart" to "quite smart" and there are probably a handful who will tend toward the upper end of the grading distribution through some combination of hard work, "intelligence," and other factors. And there is some small chance that you may have someone who is "in a league of their own" (to use your words), but honestly you shouldn't worry about that at all because chances are you will never even know it. I would honestly think that my friend was likely a slacker who was getting grades near the bottom of the class (which wouldn't even be a bad thing) if I didn't know them so well, and I imagine that most of the people from our section think that about this person.

Rodgepwnd

New
Posts: 6
Joined: Thu Mar 23, 2017 3:49 pm

Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby Rodgepwnd » Sat Dec 15, 2018 4:27 pm

kdxsam wrote:
inquinate123 wrote:Does anyone know if Jesse Fried gives LP's in Corporations?


Well, in the last day of class he told everyone to "chillax." He also said he's generous with the curve and that he only failed one person in 20 years of teaching. Didn't say if he gives out LPs though.


Does anyone else, especially past students, have insight into this? A toodope evaluation on Fried says he straight up said he didn't give LPs, but I don't know if that eval was for Corporations or some other class.

User avatar
Pneumonia

Gold
Posts: 1935
Joined: Sun Jul 29, 2012 3:05 pm

Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby Pneumonia » Sat Dec 15, 2018 11:04 pm

UpstairsNapkin wrote:
Splurgles23 wrote:
khaosan17 wrote:Dear 2Ls and 3Ls,

How wide would you say is the range in intellectual capacity within a section?

Are you bound to have 2~3 students in the section who just stand out and you know you can never outperform them?

Even at HLS, are you bound to see “smart” kids who are just in a league of their own?

Thanks.



The law is not like math, or physics (or even creative writing): being in a "league of their own" is a thing in terms of work ethic and perseverance. It's not a coincidence that some kids will have almost all H's and DS's and almost no P's, but it also won't be a matter of some intrinsic intellectual brilliance: it will be a combination of intelligence, work ethic, and access to resources. But yes, it's true that some kids will outpace the others in their overall combination of this package.

The other thing I will say (as a transfer to HLS) is that it's true that, unlike my other school (a lower T-14), *no one* at HLS is not smart (ie, someone who just worked hard to get to law school).


The bolded is just not true. To the extent that you are just drawing a generalization that overall, people at the top of the class will tend to have gotten there through hard work and perseverance, then sure. But, it really seems like you are making a blanket statement that law school is not something that one excels at through sheer brilliance (unlike, in your opinion, math/physics).

I don't share this stuff lightly, and I'm posting this from a burner account because I'm pretty sure a couple people on this forum could identify me and/or this person from this info, but I wanted to speak up because over the past couple years I have seen quite a few posts asserting this (or very similar) viewpoints, and they never go unchallenged, and I can tell you with complete certainty that law school is something that can be excelled at simply through having outlier intelligence (I'm talking about true outlier intelligence, not just "oh i score in the 99th percentile" intelligence).

A good friend of mine has a GPA above 4.5 (mostly DS's, smattering of Hs), although only attending approximately 10% of all of their law school classes, with most of that attendance coming from the first semester of law school (for instance, this semester they just took an exam for a class that they literally never attended once; they wouldn't have been able to pick the professor out of a random lineup). They spend their time throughout the whole semester playing videogames and generally just hanging out, and then during reading week they learn the entirety of the class material and ace all their exams. For example (and the way I found out about all this), 1L year I went over to their apartment soon after classes let out to talk about a property practice exam with them. They were completely useless--knew next to nothing about the subject. They said they needed some time to learn the material and proposed we meet up again in two days. We did, and it was like a completely different person; they seemed to have complete mastery of the material. Our exam was a few days later and they ended up getting a DS in the class. Note that this was 1L year, so they also had 3 other exams that they had to be doing this for as well.

Furthermore, this doesn't just extend to exam-based classes. I have taken paper-based classes with this person and seen them write the entirety of their term paper the day it is due; I was even their partner for 1L Ames and they did basically the same thing for our brief (although modified somewhat to accommodate working with me), which, yes, they got a DS on.

To get the best idea of this person, you should basically imagine Good Will Hunting, both in terms of intellect and (especially) attitude. They legit just don't care about law school (or seemingly any kind of career ambitions) and seem to be getting these top grades because somehow it is actually the path of least resistance for them. They did not do law review (or any journal for that matter), are not a part of any student org, and aren't clerking. In fact, people from HLS contacted them early on about placing them into feeder clerkships, and they straight up brushed those people off completely: not interested. This included our Climenko Fellow who straight up told my friend they could give her/him a great shot at clerking with the SCOTUS Justice that our Fellow had previously clerked for. This person just legit doesn't give a shit.

Another reason I bring up the comparisons to Good Will Hunting is specifically because of what you said about law school not being like math/physics, which I took to mean that it doesn't lend itself to the same kind of savant-type ability to excel. But here is the thing: I have actually talked about this quite a bit with my friend, and they think there are actually substantial similarities. First of all, my friend is undoubtedly what we would consider a math savant. I'm trying not to identify this person too closely, but suffice to say that they have some connection with people in the physics grad department at Harvard and I have been around them speaking together and heard him talk with ridiculous authority on some of the stuff. They clearly have a very advanced understanding of math despite not having ever taken advanced classes (their undergrad degree is not in STEM). I have seen a number of varied examples that make me supremely confident that they are a math savant, including them being given a math problem from a field that they had no knowledge of, and then essentially teaching themselves the math through solving the problem itself. To this day, that is one of the more ridiculous things I have seen in my life. Also, almost as an aside, they almost certainly have a photographic memory. I thought they probably did, and so one time I gave them 30 seconds to memorize the first fifty digits of pi, which they recited back with ease.

They have noted many times before that math problems and law exams are really not fundamentally different to them, that they are both (in their words) very formulaic and at their core just require simple parsing and logic gates to solve optimally. Furthermore, from what I have seen, I think grades in law school are exactly the kind of thing that plays into the hands of these types. Blind-grading: to the extent this person even does go to class, they never participate; I don't recall them ever volunteering any comment or question for the entirety of 1L (we were in the same section). Entirety of grade based on one single exam: lends itself to the "slack-off then cram" mindset; if grades were more project-based or reliant on things turned in throughout the semester they probably wouldn't do as well (they told me they failed some of their high school classes simply because homework and various assignments were weighted heavily and they never did them). Exams themselves: very formulaic, don't require much (if any) creative thinking.

All this to say, there is a major tendency to think that everyone struggles with law school, and that even those who are excelling are having a hard time, and are probably excelling in major part due to hard work rather than simply being smarter than the average HLS student. There also seems to be a common conception that most law students who act like they aren't studying/working hard are some sort of "secret gunners" who are really just concealing the extent to which they work. I'm not saying that these generalizations don't hold true for the most part, but that they are certainly not absolute, which is why it irks me a bit when I see people throw out these ideas as absolute all the time. For instance, I remember a while back in this thread (right after exams, when everyone was worrying and trying to predict grades) someone said that "literally no one knows how they did when they walk out of a law school exam," as if it were some absolute truth. That cracked me up because I remembered talking with my friend after 1st semester of 1L exams had just finished. We were talking about how we thought we did and my friend said that they knew that they got a DS in 4 specific classes, but in one class they thought they could have gotten anything from an LP to a DS because the exam was too ambiguous or something like that. When grades came out it turned out they got 4DS and 1H, with the H coming in the class they admitted to having no idea as to how they performed. Now, I understand that you may argue that this is confirmation/hindsight bias, but with everything I know of this person, I think it is much more likely that (contrary to the absolute "truism" stated on these boards) my friend just legitimately knew exactly how they did on the exams.

As to OP, I would say that the range of "intellectual capacity" in a section is really not meaningful at all. For the most part people fall into a completely undifferentiated mass of "fairly smart" to "quite smart" and there are probably a handful who will tend toward the upper end of the grading distribution through some combination of hard work, "intelligence," and other factors. And there is some small chance that you may have someone who is "in a league of their own" (to use your words), but honestly you shouldn't worry about that at all because chances are you will never even know it. I would honestly think that my friend was likely a slacker who was getting grades near the bottom of the class (which wouldn't even be a bad thing) if I didn't know them so well, and I imagine that most of the people from our section think that about this person.


QFP

lomp123

New
Posts: 27
Joined: Wed Mar 01, 2017 11:30 am

Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby lomp123 » Sun Dec 16, 2018 5:36 pm

Does anyone have any experience living in downtown Boston and commuting? Specifically looking at somewhere in Beacon Hill. I would like to live in the city my 3L year since I'll likely only have to come to campus a few times a week. Any suggestions for places to live and when you found housing would be great!

Mercat

New
Posts: 4
Joined: Tue Aug 21, 2018 5:22 pm

Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby Mercat » Sat Dec 29, 2018 8:00 am

Is there any chance of getting one of the 1-bedroom suites in Hastings, either small or large, as a 1L? Do those go very fast? Thanks!

mn40

New
Posts: 17
Joined: Thu Jan 23, 2014 11:49 pm

Re: Harvard Student(s) Answering Your Questions

Postby mn40 » Wed Jan 09, 2019 8:57 pm

What is the general cutoff for cum laude? When abstracted onto 10 courses, how many Hs are generally sufficient? 5 out of 10? 6 out of 10? 7 out of 10? For magna, I'm guessing at least 10/10 Hs?



Return to “Ask a Law Student / Graduate?

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests