Applying to opposing counsel’s firm

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Applying to opposing counsel’s firm

Postby Anonymous User » Thu Jun 13, 2019 10:20 am

There is a firm in my city I’d like to apply to. However, I recently discovered that the firm is frequently on the opposing side of my firm in litigations - in fact they are opposing counsel on a litigation I am on right now.

I am just a third year so I don’t anticipate tons of conflicts. It’s more of an issue of it being awkward if I interview (and esp what might happen if they reject me). I’m almost certain people I’m the practice group will recognize me if I apply/interview.

Does anyone have any thoughts on whether it’d be advisable to apply?

Anonymous User
Posts: 334374
Joined: Tue Aug 11, 2009 9:32 am

Re: Applying to opposing counsel’s firm

Postby Anonymous User » Thu Jun 13, 2019 11:09 am

So I sort of did this when I was looking to move from a small firm to a big firm. Our matter concluded before the big firm had an opening, but I actually reached out to the partner that was on the opposite side of the case I was litigating. I told him I applied and straight up asked him if he’d get my resume another look. I had a screener interview in less than two weeks. I was ultimately ghosted by the firm (and didn’t have the experience for the particular practice group anyways), but the partner connection definitely got me the screener.

My advice is to go for it, but I think it’s worth reaching out to the most senior attorney on any matters you litigated against (e.g. partner, senior associate, etc.) and let them know you’re going to apply and to keep it confidential. Most people are actually very professional with keeping confidentiality with applicants from competitors. The caveat to this is that you’d obviously have to feel confident about the work you did against the firm. My strategy could have resulted in a bad recommendation had I done questionable things during litigation.



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