Page 1 of 1

Jumping from Family Law

Posted: Tue Jan 09, 2018 10:51 pm
by Akriant
I guess the topic says it all.

I am a 2015 graduate from a regional school in Midwest. Worked for slightly less than two years for legal aid giving out advices on variety of questions, and then mostly fam law and juvi cases. Recently-ish got a job in private practice fam law firm, mostly because bigger pay was offered. I can tell that fam law is draining me and I am contemplating an exit strategy within the next 2 or 3 years. Any ideas where it's realistic to jump into? I've invested my law school into business and transactional law back in law school (naive me).... buuut I am pretty sure the chances of getting anywhere near are nonexistent. Anyone can bounce some ideas?

Cynical advices are welcome as well =)

Re: Jumping from Family Law

Posted: Wed Jan 10, 2018 3:42 pm
by LockBox
Why are you looking to get out of family law? I know you said it's draining, but why? My concern is that if you "take your work home" with you, then you might burn out in another field as well.

Re: Jumping from Family Law

Posted: Wed Jan 10, 2018 10:22 pm
by Akriant
LockBox wrote:Why are you looking to get out of family law? I know you said it's draining, but why? My concern is that if you "take your work home" with you, then you might burn out in another field as well.



Nah, it's not that. I don't mind drafting motions/petitions/objections/decrees and orders while I'm home, nor replying to odd emails at times. If you mean "taking your work home" in a sense that it weights on me when I'm home - that's not really that either, I have clear dividing lines of work/home and they are always intact.

I guess my issue is the amount of drama and at times difficult clients that this field of law brings. It's a draining experience during the day at work, not always, but fairly frequently, and as a consequence - I come home in an ok mood and all, but super tired and not really looking forward to the next day at the job.

Re: Jumping from Family Law

Posted: Fri Jan 12, 2018 5:32 pm
by Anonymous User
Akriant wrote:
LockBox wrote:Why are you looking to get out of family law? I know you said it's draining, but why? My concern is that if you "take your work home" with you, then you might burn out in another field as well.



Nah, it's not that. I don't mind drafting motions/petitions/objections/decrees and orders while I'm home, nor replying to odd emails at times. If you mean "taking your work home" in a sense that it weights on me when I'm home - that's not really that either, I have clear dividing lines of work/home and they are always intact.

I guess my issue is the amount of drama and at times difficult clients that this field of law brings. It's a draining experience during the day at work, not always, but fairly frequently, and as a consequence - I come home in an ok mood and all, but super tired and not really looking forward to the next day at the job.


So all I can say is that i've been to a civil calendar and there is just about as much (if not more) drama dealing with some of those attorneys than there are with some family law clients. My point is that, unless you can leave work at work, it won't really matter what your practice is. Now, if you don't enjoy family law itself, that's a different story...

Re: Jumping from Family Law

Posted: Fri Jan 12, 2018 5:33 pm
by Anonymous User
Anonymous User wrote:
Akriant wrote:
LockBox wrote:Why are you looking to get out of family law? I know you said it's draining, but why? My concern is that if you "take your work home" with you, then you might burn out in another field as well.



Nah, it's not that. I don't mind drafting motions/petitions/objections/decrees and orders while I'm home, nor replying to odd emails at times. If you mean "taking your work home" in a sense that it weights on me when I'm home - that's not really that either, I have clear dividing lines of work/home and they are always intact.

I guess my issue is the amount of drama and at times difficult clients that this field of law brings. It's a draining experience during the day at work, not always, but fairly frequently, and as a consequence - I come home in an ok mood and all, but super tired and not really looking forward to the next day at the job.


So all I can say is that i've been to a civil calendar and there is just about as much (if not more) drama dealing with some of those attorneys than there are with some family law clients. My point is that, unless you can leave work at work, it won't really matter what your practice is. Now, if you don't enjoy family law itself, that's a different story...


Inadvertent anon. I was the first response to OP.

Re: Jumping from Family Law

Posted: Fri Jan 12, 2018 5:41 pm
by A. Nony Mouse
I think it’s totally reasonable that someone would find family law more draining than other kinds of law. The drama and difficulty of, say, divorcing clients is way different from the drama of corporate bigwigs losing it.

Re: Jumping from Family Law

Posted: Fri Jan 12, 2018 7:20 pm
by Bikeflip
A. Nony Mouse wrote:I think it’s totally reasonable that someone would find family law more draining than other kinds of law. The drama and difficulty of, say, divorcing clients is way different from the drama of corporate bigwigs losing it.


Seriously. The old adage that family law is dealing with the best people at their worst moment is true. OP, is your firm just family law or is family law one of many areas? Lateralling to another family law firm that has a broader practice may be an option for you.

Re: Jumping from Family Law

Posted: Fri Jan 12, 2018 7:28 pm
by unlicensedpotato
Anonymous User wrote:
Akriant wrote:
LockBox wrote:Why are you looking to get out of family law? I know you said it's draining, but why? My concern is that if you "take your work home" with you, then you might burn out in another field as well.



Nah, it's not that. I don't mind drafting motions/petitions/objections/decrees and orders while I'm home, nor replying to odd emails at times. If you mean "taking your work home" in a sense that it weights on me when I'm home - that's not really that either, I have clear dividing lines of work/home and they are always intact.

I guess my issue is the amount of drama and at times difficult clients that this field of law brings. It's a draining experience during the day at work, not always, but fairly frequently, and as a consequence - I come home in an ok mood and all, but super tired and not really looking forward to the next day at the job.


So all I can say is that i've been to a civil calendar and there is just about as much (if not more) drama dealing with some of those attorneys than there are with some family law clients. My point is that, unless you can leave work at work, it won't really matter what your practice is. Now, if you don't enjoy family law itself, that's a different story...


You don't sound like someone who has done any family law. I think OP's position makes complete sense and that a change to a different area of lit would help.

Re: Jumping from Family Law

Posted: Fri Jan 12, 2018 8:20 pm
by tyroneslothrop1
Bikeflip wrote:
A. Nony Mouse wrote:I think it’s totally reasonable that someone would find family law more draining than other kinds of law. The drama and difficulty of, say, divorcing clients is way different from the drama of corporate bigwigs losing it.


Seriously. The old adage that family law is dealing with the best people at their worst moment is true. OP, is your firm just family law or is family law one of many areas? Lateralling to another family law firm that has a broader practice may be an option for you.


Probably a lot dealing with the worst people at their worst moments as well. Doesn't sound fun.

Re: Jumping from Family Law

Posted: Fri Jan 12, 2018 9:12 pm
by Anonymous User
OP: I practiced in another area of law and now do family law. It is draining. That being said, in my previous line of work, I also felt the same stress and drainage from high-pressured clients and insurance companies.

Are you sure it is not related to private practice vs. public interest/non-profit? You did PI before - mostly family law, juvenile work and other personal stuff previously - and that sounds pretty similar to what you are doing now. It may be more about the pressure of a private firm as far as hours, collections, etc. Not saying it necessarily is, but just a thought.

I will send you a PM.

Re: Jumping from Family Law

Posted: Sat Jan 13, 2018 12:12 pm
by Bikeflip
tyroneslothrop1 wrote:
Bikeflip wrote:
A. Nony Mouse wrote:I think it’s totally reasonable that someone would find family law more draining than other kinds of law. The drama and difficulty of, say, divorcing clients is way different from the drama of corporate bigwigs losing it.


Seriously. The old adage that family law is dealing with the best people at their worst moment is true. OP, is your firm just family law or is family law one of many areas? Lateralling to another family law firm that has a broader practice may be an option for you.


Probably a lot dealing with the worst people at their worst moments as well. Doesn't sound fun.



Nah that's the crim law adage. But point taken.

Re: Jumping from Family Law

Posted: Fri Feb 02, 2018 10:42 pm
by Subban_Fan
Akriant wrote:I guess the topic says it all.

I am a 2015 graduate from a regional school in Midwest. Worked for slightly less than two years for legal aid giving out advices on variety of questions, and then mostly fam law and juvi cases. Recently-ish got a job in private practice fam law firm, mostly because bigger pay was offered. I can tell that fam law is draining me and I am contemplating an exit strategy within the next 2 or 3 years. Any ideas where it's realistic to jump into? I've invested my law school into business and transactional law back in law school (naive me).... buuut I am pretty sure the chances of getting anywhere near are nonexistent. Anyone can bounce some ideas?

Cynical advices are welcome as well =)


Have you thought about applying to city attorney or county prosecutor offices in the same region as your school? They might like your experience on juvenile cases. And with fam law, you have the court experience most offices want in assistant city attorneys or ADAs.

I'm not sure whether that will be "less draining" though. I tend to meet far more happy prosecutor and criminal defense attorneys than I do family law attorneys though.