Do you consider a JD a doctoral degree, and is it unusual to take a Postdoc fellow/associate position without a PhD?

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Re: Do you consider a JD a doctoral degree, and is it unusual to take a Postdoc fellow/associate position without a PhD?

Postby Anonymous User » Sat Oct 07, 2017 8:58 pm

FYI, USCIS considers a J.D. a "doctorate" and treats it as such when assessing any related immigration benefits, much like they would treat a foreign student receiving a Ph.D. in chemistry.

ETA: accidental anon

JusticeJackson

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Re: Do you consider a JD a doctoral degree, and is it unusual to take a Postdoc fellow/associate position without a PhD?

Postby JusticeJackson » Sat Oct 07, 2017 10:05 pm

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Last edited by JusticeJackson on Sat Dec 16, 2017 11:06 pm, edited 1 time in total.


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abogadesq

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Re: Do you consider a JD a doctoral degree, and is it unusual to take a Postdoc fellow/associate position without a PhD?

Postby abogadesq » Mon Oct 16, 2017 11:17 pm

Anonymous User wrote:As someone with both a PhD and a JD, it always pisses me off when people with JDs call themselves doctors. The amount of sweat you put into that JD pales compared to a PhD from a top notch R1.


I don't think I've ever heard of an attorney calling themselves "doctor" with the exception of attorneys catering to Spanish-speaking clients (attorneys are called doctors in Latin America). An attorney stylizing themselves as a doctor is incredibly pathetic.

legalace

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Re: Do you consider a JD a doctoral degree, and is it unusual to take a Postdoc fellow/associate position without a PhD?

Postby legalace » Wed Mar 14, 2018 3:54 pm

https://surveys.nces.ed.gov/ipeds/VisGl ... idlink=942
"Doctor's degree-professional practice
A doctor's degree that is conferred upon completion of a program providing the knowledge and skills for the recognition, credential, or license required for professional practice. The degree is awarded after a period of study such that the total time to the degree, including both pre-professional and professional preparation, equals at least six full-time equivalent academic years. Some of these degrees were formerly classified as first-professional and may include: Chiropractic (D.C. or D.C.M.); Dentistry (D.D.S. or D.M.D.); Law (J.D.); Medicine (M.D.); Optometry (O.D.); Osteopathic Medicine (D.O); Pharmacy (Pharm.D.); Podiatry (D.P.M., Pod.D., D.P.); or, Veterinary Medicine (D.V.M.), and others, as designated by the awarding institution."

https://surveys.nces.ed.gov/ipeds/VisGl ... idlink=941
"Doctor's degree-research/scholarship
A Ph.D. or other doctor's degree that requires advanced work beyond the master's level, including the preparation and defense of a dissertation based on original research, or the planning and execution of an original project demonstrating substantial artistic or scholarly achievement. Some [other] examples of this type of degree may include ... D.B.A., [Ed.D., J.S.D.,] ... and others, as designated by the awarding institution."

The term doctorate is generally used to refer to the latter type of doctor's degree.

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Re: Do you consider a JD a doctoral degree, and is it unusual to take a Postdoc fellow/associate position without a PhD?

Postby Anonymous User » Wed Mar 14, 2018 4:42 pm

Nebby wrote:JSD are for people that don't have the credentials for academia and don't like the practice of law.


This is completely wrong.

JSD or SJD are for foreign legal scholars (foreigners that want to enter either their own country's legal academia or the American legal academia). Decades ago, it used to be for people that went to low-tier schools but hope to enter academia.



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